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CORROSION RISK

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CORROSION
  • Corrosion is a primary reason for the deterioration of a vessel's integrity and critical vessel systems, decreasing their availability, reliability, and safety.

  • Corrosion is the enemy of materials engineers, boat and vessel builders, and vessel owners alike. 

  • Corrosion has also become a global problem with serious economic, health, safety, and technological consequences worldwide.

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THE ROLE OF SEAWATER
  • Prolonged contact with seawater will corrode, degrade, and decay almost any substance including fibreglass, wood, or metal. 

  • Corrosive elements from seawater can seep into vital mechanical parts and electrical wiring. 

  • Over time corrosion from seawater will ultimately jeopardize the safety of a vessel. In extreme cases, if corrosion is left unmonitored, it can lead to an asset's integrity failure, posing safety risks to personnel, equipment costs, and subsequent environmental damage.

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TYPICAL CHALLENGES

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THE PROBLEM WITH CURRENT INSPECTION
  • The best defense against marine corrosion is proper care and maintenance. 

  • Corrosion tests are often conducted by visual inspection, which estimates service life, determines corrosion levels, analyzes potential causes of accidents, and verifies anticorrosion performance. 

  • However, corrosion is difficult to measure, because it can occur in difficult-to-reach places of vessels and on both sides of the hull.

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THE MONITORING APPROACH
  • While inspections focus on the entire asset and generally happen every 3-5 years (depending on the vessel’s type and size), monitoring observes and checks the progress on a specific area of the vessel. It includes regular data collection to track changes in corrosion in the area being monitored. 

  • If corrosion increases rapidly, quarterly monitoring might be changed to monthly monitoring to track the corrosion more carefully.

  • Conventional corrosion inspection and monitoring are expensive and time-consuming. It often involves drydocking the vessel. When corrosion reaches critical levels – it becomes more costly to repair. 

  • Regular monitoring is imperative to reduce the time the vessel spends in a drydock and decrease maintenance costs.